Zwischen Kirk und Kafka – FilmBlogPodcast seit 2006

Nachtrag zu Nippon Connection:
„Rinco’s Restaurant“

Rinco's Restaurant

Nippon Connection 2011 – Thomas über „Rinco’s Restaurant“
(Shokudo katatsumuri) von Mai TOMINAGA

Ein Frauenfilm, ein Film für Köche, eine warmherzige und leichter bekömmliche Variante von „Die wunderbare Welt der Amelie“ – eine tragische Komödie, darüber, dass Liebe doch durch den Magen geht :-) Kathy weiß, was das nun wiederum mit Slow Food zu tun hat:

„Freshness and simplicity are two of the defining features of traditional Japanese cooking. While in recent decades fast food may have made substantial gains in terms of popularity, there has long been a strong counter-resistance to these pressures of modernity. Rinco’s Restaurant (Shokudo Katatsumuri, 2010) is a film designed to appeal to an audience who appreciates organic slow food. In fact, a literal translation of the film title is actually “Snail Restaurant” – a name that Rinco chooses because of the slow and loving way in which she prepares her food.“

Sehr sehenswert, findet auch Holly Becker:

„But anyway, this film, Rinco’s Restaurant, is a Japanese film and has lots of gorgeous scenes in it and if you love to cook and enjoy lots of eye candy, you must check it out. (…) There is a lot of depth in this film and loads of creative vision and fun things to look at — each scene could be a picture, it’s all quite visually stunning. I watched it on the long haul flight from Los Angeles on Monday and found myself totally lost in the sheer prettiness of it all…“

Und Nils warnt hungrige Zuschauer zurecht:

„One final word of warning: make sure you are either pretty well stuffed or you have quick access to food while watching this film. The „restaurant“ bit of the title isn’t merely there for show, the film features quite a few cooking scenes which are mouth-watering sublime. It’s something in the way the Japanese think about food (think Kamome Diner) which turns their preparation of food into an almost sacred art. There is no shortage of people cooking in front of sun-lit windows, enjoying the sound and smells of steaming, sizzling pans in front of them, so beware.“